Charity Investigation into Kids Company

Charity Investigation into Kids Company

The commission’s inquiry will address concerns about the administration, governance and financial management of the charity, and identify wider lessons for other charities and trustees.

New charity investigation: Kids Company

The Charity Commission, the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, has opened a statutory inquiry into the charity Kids Company (registered as Keeping Kids Company, registered charity number 1068298).

The commission’s inquiry will address concerns about the administration, governance and financial management of the charity, and identify wider lessons for other charities and trustees.

The commission has been engaging with the charity since 17 July 2015 over specific allegations relating to financial management and governance issues. The charity closed on 5 August, but the commission’s regulatory interest has continued. The commission has also been in contact with a number of statutory and public agencies including the Insolvency Service, and instigated a multi-agency meeting on 13 August 2015 to ensure effective coordination and liaison with other relevant agencies in carrying out their respective roles.

In light of the intense public scrutiny and speculation over the charity’s activities, and the increasing number of allegations in the public domain about its governance and financial management, the commission has now formalised its engagement in a statutory inquiry in order to investigate and put on the public record whether or not these allegations are found to be true. This is in line with the regulator’s duty to promote public trust and confidence in charities.

The trustees have been cooperating with the commission throughout its engagement with the charity. The trustees have welcomed the inquiry and will continue to cooperate with the commission.

The inquiry will liaise where appropriate with the Official Receiver and Insolvency Service. The work of the Official Receiver takes precedence over the commission’s inquiry. The commission will take into account their findings (see endnote 1).

It is the commission’s policy, after it has concluded an inquiry, to publish a report detailing what issues the inquiry looked at, what actions were undertaken as part of the inquiry and what the outcomes were. Reports of previous inquiries by the commission are available on GOV.UK.

Ends

PR 54/15


Notes to editors

  1. The Charity Commission is the independent registrar and regulator of charities in England and Wales, acting in the public’s interest, to ensure that:
    • charities know what they have to do
    • the public know what charities do
    • charities are held to account
  2. Section 46 of the Charities Act 2011 gives the commission the power to institute inquiries. The opening of an inquiry gives the commission access to a range of investigative, protective and remedial legal powers.
  3. The commission’s decision to announce the opening of a statutory inquiry is based on whether it is in the public interest to do so and with consideration of our objective to increase public trust and confidence in charities.
  4. Further information about the work of the Official Receiver is available on the website of the Insolvency Service.

Endnotes

  1. The Official Receiver was appointed yesterday by the court to wind up the charity. Their role is to investigate the reasons why the charity went into insolvency and to distribute the remaining assets of the company to the creditors.

Press office

Enjoyed this post? Share it!