Posts tagged "ICT"

112552-2013: UK-London: External service providers for software applications: online transactional processing systems — EMA/2011/17/ICT — 2 lots

112552-2013: UK-London: External service providers for software applications: online transactional processing systems — EMA/2011/17/ICT — 2 lots
Publication date: 06-04-2013 | Deadline: 21-04-2013 | Document: Additional information

http://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:112552-2013:TEXT:EN:HTML

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Posted by admin - April 6, 2013 at 08:00

Categories: Government Tenders   Tags: , ,

Michael Gove accused of major gaps in draft national curriculum for English

Leaked documents show new curriculum due for 2014 does not mention importance of spelling for 11- to 14-year-olds

Education Secretary Michael Gove is to introduce a new national curriculum for English that contains no mention of the importance of spelling for 11- to 14-year-olds, and waters down stipulations for reading, writing and speaking skills, according to leaked drafts.

The proposals are due to be published in the next few months, after Gove announced last year that he intends to slim down the national curriculum and produce a less dirigiste document.

The new curriculum is due to come into force in September 2014, and its brevity shows the extent to which teachers are to be left to their own devices.

The Department for Education said it would not comment on a leaked draft, and added that the final document may change.

Gove has already published proposals for a revised, slimmed-down curriculum for primary schools, and has said that academies and free schools will be free to teach outside the national curriculum, with teachers being held to account through rigorous inspections.

Stephen Twigg, the shadow education secretary, accused Gove of “preparing to introduce a narrow and out of date curriculum that will take us backwards. Incredibly there is no mention of the importance of spelling in the English curriculum for 11- to 14-year-olds. The writing, speaking and listening skills have all been watered down. There is no mention of creativity and being able to think critically or understand opposing points of view in any of these courses.”

Twigg pointed out that the CBI had called for the curriculum to make the so-called soft skills of speaking and listening a high priority.

A government source said: “Labour’s hypocrisy knows no bounds. They got rid of marks for spelling in GCSEs. We have returned them. We’re introducing a spelling, punctuation and grammar test in primary school, a primary curriculum which is much more demanding and new, tougher exams at 16. At every stage these changes have been opposed by Labour and unions.”

The draft English curriculum suggests pupils must read a range of works including the British literary heritage from both the 20th century and earlier; at least one Shakespeare play; contemporary British literature including prose, poetry and drama; and seminal world literature written in English.

The previous curriculum set out a range of specific English novelists that pupils would have to study.

Labour claimed that the curriculum was so sparse it made no mention of distinguishing between fact and opinion, no summary or note taking skills, and no mention of creativity in the English language.

Labour also complained it made no mention of the importance of taking part in structured group discussion or listening skills to judge and interpret what a speaker has said.

The draft maths curriculum makes no reference to identifying and classifying patterns, accurate mathematical diagrams, graphs and construction, or using and understanding ICT so that it can be used appropriately including with the correct syntax.

The national curriculum for maths at key stage 3 is just two and a half pages long, and for key stage 4 it is just two pages long.


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Posted by admin - October 31, 2012 at 22:23

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ICT strategy for NHS Wales aims to overcome ‘lock-in’

NHS Wales Informatics Service says failure to overcome technology lock-in will prevent service integration

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Posted by admin - October 3, 2012 at 22:56

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Newham council to create ‘mutual’

London borough’s ICT chief Geoff Connell expects to set up mutual providing customer services technologies within six months

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Posted by admin -  at 08:35

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Government releases details of SIAM framework

£250m framework intended to provide interfaces between tower service providers, users of ICT services, and contracting organisations

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Posted by admin - September 20, 2012 at 08:32

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Council says 60 SMEs attend ‘market development’ day

Bristol city council gets G-Cloud support to encourage small ICT companies to bid for business

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Posted by admin - September 10, 2012 at 22:09

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ICT managers face priority pressures as austerity bites

Growing demand for council IT services has led to decline in user satisfaction, says Socitm

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Posted by admin - September 7, 2012 at 20:25

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Audit Scotland: government needs better ICT expertise

Central resource of ICT expertise could help Scottish public sector, says watchdog

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Posted by admin - September 4, 2012 at 22:04

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Police to beef up iPad and mobile scrutiny

National Police Improvement Agency says e-forensics have aided 90% rise in number of computers, iPads and mobile phones examined by police

The National Police Improvement Agency (NPIA) said it wants an e-forensics project, aimed at speeding up the examination of ICT used by criminals, to be available to all forces from September.

Over the past seven years, the number of electronic devices examined by technology experts in police force hi-tech crime units (HTCUs) has grown nationally by 300%.

A six-month pilot of the e-forensics project with five forces in the East Midlands resulted in a 90% increase in the number of computers and mobile phones examined, according to the agency.

Currently the process for police officers to request an examination of a computer or mobile phone varies from force to force.

The NPIA said that it helped to set up a pilot which enabled police officers to contact one of the technology experts from the five force HTCUs involved in the scheme.

The officers would have their examination requests assessed before being sent to their force HTCU for investigation.

Part of the process involved assessing how best to examine the device by prioritising against several factors, including the threat posed by the offender, the seriousness of the crime and risk to the victim.

According to the NPIA, the pilot resulted in standardised examinations, reviews and investigation across the Northamptonshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire forces.

Deputy chief constable Paul Crowthe, the Association of Chief Police Officers’ lead on e-forensics, said: “With the emergence of technology impacting on many crime types, the police service has recognised that all police forces were spending an increasing amount of time, money and staff on interrogating electronic devices and mobiles phones.

“This project has dramatically reduced the time taken over each device and has also made a massive impact into case loads.”

Paul Ridgewell, criminal justice analyst at Kable, said: “This initiative conforms to the wider agenda both of the NPIA and its successor organisation, the new police ICT company ‘newco’, in terms of promoting standardised procedures and systems.

“But it raises a question as to whether this important role will be carried out to quite the same extent in future, given the current level of uncertainty about newco’s role and the extensive structural changes taking place in the police sector.”

This article is published by Guardian Professional. Join the Guardian Public Leaders Network free to receive regular emails on the issues at the top of the professional agenda.


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Posted by admin - August 23, 2012 at 17:45

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MPs urge MoJ to put ICT at heart of business strategy

New approach to ICT will help Ministry of Justice get more for less spend, says select committee

The House of Commons’ justice committee has called on the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to make ICT an integral part of its business strategy so that it knows where to target improvements.

In a report on the MoJ’s budget and structure, the committee says that at a time when funds are scarce, it is essential that the ministry can get the greatest benefit for minimum cost.

It also recommends that it appoints a programme management leader for any future ICT projects, who will follow individual project from inception to implementation and be the senior responsible owner.

One of the main achievements of the transforming justice programme has been the establishment of shared services centres, where corporate services are provided across the MoJ according to the committee.

It urges the ministry to promote its shared service centres to other government departments, in order to gain additional income.

Last year the MoJ signed a contract with Savvis to develop a shared services platform for finance, HR and payroll. It is waiting for that to be fully operational.

Chris Pennell, principal analyst at Kable, said: “The MoJ is in a transitional phase as it moves from its current shared services operations to a new model.

“It will need to ensure that the project remains on track and on budget, which is going to be challenging.”

As a result of the organisational complexity of the core department and its agencies, the MoJ has a wide number of ICT systems. In 2010-11 its budget for technology totalled £590m.

In evidence to the committee, the Law Society pointed to a long history of underinvestment in court ICT. It said that it was difficult to evaluate the MoJ’s use of IT because of the complex history of its IT, inheritance of legacy systems and the changing landscape of government ICT overall.

The report says that the MoJ is aware that it needs to introduce new ways of working to help reduce its overall budget by 23% by 2014-15.

It told the committee that over the next 3–5 years it intends to further reduce “run and maintain” ICT costs by more than £100m by replacing or renewing all major ICT contracts under its Future ICT Sourcing programme.

“In procuring by service tower we will standardise services across MoJ, making them much more economic,” the ministry said.

Pennell said: “There have been several critical reports recently from the National Audit Office about the MoJ’s case management systems, which pointed to a need for further investment.

“In addition, there is a lack of overall interoperability which needs to be addressed if these systems are to support the department in its drive to reduce budgets.”

This article is published by Guardian Professional. Join the Guardian Government Computing Network free to receive regular emails on the issues at the top of the professional agenda.


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Posted by admin - August 21, 2012 at 21:42

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