Trafford Council Advocacy and Advice Tender

Trafford Council Advocacy and Advice Tender

Trafford Council are tendering their Advocacy, Information and advice, Prevention and Wellbeing Services. This will come under 3 lots.

United Kingdom-Manchester: Health and social work services

2015/S 099-180328

Contract notice

Services

Directive 2004/18/EC

Section I: Contracting authority

I.1)Name, addresses and contact point(s)

Trafford Council
1st Floor, Trafford Town Hall, Stretford
For the attention of: Mr James Hunter
M32 0TH Manchester
UNITED KINGDOM
Telephone: +44 1619122572
E-mail: james.hunter@star-procurement.gov.uk
Fax: +44 1619124272

Internet address(es):

General address of the contracting authority: www.the-chest.org.uk

Address of the buyer profile: www.the-chest.org.uk

Electronic access to information: www.the-chest.org.uk

Electronic submission of tenders and requests to participate: www.the-chest.org.uk

Further information can be obtained from: Trafford Council
1st Floor, Trafford Town Hall
For the attention of: Mr James Hunter
M32 0TH Stretford
UNITED KINGDOM
Telephone: +44 1619122572
E-mail: james.hunter@star-procurement.gov.uk
Fax: +44 1619124272

Specifications and additional documents (including documents for competitive dialogue and a dynamic purchasing system) can be obtained from: Trafford Council
1st Floor, Trafford Town Hall
For the attention of: Mr James Hunter
M32 0TH Stretford
UNITED KINGDOM
Telephone: +44 1619122572
E-mail: james.hunter@star-procurement.gov.uk
Fax: +44 1619124272

Tenders or requests to participate must be sent to: Trafford Council
1st Floor, Trafford Town Hall
For the attention of: Mr James Hunter
M32 0TH Stretford
UNITED KINGDOM
Telephone: +44 1619122572
E-mail: james.hunter@star-procurement.gov.uk
Fax: +44 1619124272

I.2)Type of the contracting authority

Body governed by public law

I.3)Main activity

Health

I.4)Contract award on behalf of other contracting authorities

The contracting authority is purchasing on behalf of other contracting authorities: no

Section II: Object of the contract

II.1)Description

II.1.1)Title attributed to the contract by the contracting authority:

Trafford Council’s Advocacy, Advice, Prevention and Wellbeing Service (T441).

II.1.2)Type of contract and location of works, place of delivery or of performance

Services
Service category No 25: Health and social services
NUTS code

II.1.3)Information about a public contract, a framework agreement or a dynamic purchasing system (DPS)

The notice involves a public contract
II.1.4)Information on framework agreement

II.1.5)Short description of the contract or purchase(s)

Trafford Council are tendering their Advocacy, Information and advice, Prevention and Wellbeing Services. This will come under 3 lots.
Advocacy:
Trafford Council is committed to providing a universal, high quality, consistent and integrated Advocacy Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
To achieve this Trafford Borough Council (The Council) is planning to bring together a range of Independent Advocacy Casework functions to create an all-encompassing Advocacy Service, able to directly or indirectly provide a range of independent advocacy, for people requiring support.
This will include;
— statutory provision, Independent Mental Health Advocacy IMHA, Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy IMCA, Independent Care Act Advocacy ICAA, Independent NHS Complaints Advocacy ICA (from April 2016),
— extension of existing services offering advocacy support for vulnerable people, including people with physical impairments, learning disabilities and mental health conditions. This could be directly on an individual basis, through advocacy groups, or empowering self advocacy by building skills and confidence.
Information and Advice:
Trafford Council is committed to provide a universal high quality, consistent and integrated Information and Advice Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
1.2. Good information (which is current, relevant and accurate) is essential for all adults and their relatives who need, or may need support in order to know their rights and to live independently. Good information should help Trafford residents and carers make informed choices, enable them to take control and help service users and carers to maintain their abilities, skills and independence well into the future.
1.3. Information and advice often go hand in hand, but for the purposes of this document, it is important to be clear about the distinct definitions. Using the definitions outlined in Putting People First, in this context information to mean ‘the open and accessible supply of material deemed to be of interest to a particular population. This can either be passively available or actively distributed’.
1.4. Advice ‘offers guidance and direction on a particular course of action which needs to be taken in order to realise a need, access a service or realise individual entitlements’
1.5. The overall vision nationally for information and advice is set out in Putting People First milestone four:
‘All citizens should be able to easily find locally relevant quality information and advice about their care and support needs in order to enable control and inform choice. Information should be available in a range of formats and through channels to make it accessible to all groups. Provision of information, advice and guidance should move from being largely developed from separate initiatives to a single coherent service strategy’.
2. Care act requirements:
The local authority must establish and maintain a service for providing people in its area with information and advice relating to care and support for adults and support for carers.
The local authority must provide information on:
— what types of care and support are available,
— the range of care and support services available to local people,
— the processes local people need to use to access the available support,
— where local people can find independent financial advice,
— how people can raise concerns about the safety or well-being of someone who has care and support needs.
3. Demographics/need in Trafford:
Overview:
The Trafford demographic is split between age groups is similar to that of England; the population is amongst the healthiest in the North West — but the North West is the least healthy region in the country; Trafford remains the ‘economic powerhouse’ of the region with world leading brands situated in the Borough, and with below regional average levels of unemployment. Crime in Trafford is low and has decreased significantly over the last few years.
Overall, Trafford is a relatively affluent Borough, certainly in regional terms, but also in national terms. It is one of the smaller District Councils within the Greater Manchester conurbation in terms of population, at 217 000 people, living in an estimated 96 000 dwellings and supporting in the region of 136 000 employee jobs. Trafford retains its status as the economic power house of the Greater Manchester conurbation.
The area has a strong local business base, high skill levels, a massively successful enterprise culture and above average levels of economic activity.

Trafford is home to more than 8 000 businesses ranging from household names to specialised niche, skilled operations; from sole traders to large organisations employing more than 500 people. More than 99 % of businesses are small and medium sized enterprises reflecting the business structure of the 21st century economy.

Prevention and well-being:
Prevention and well-being services encourage care and support to be delivered in a partnership between individuals, communities, the voluntary sector, the NHS and councils. By supporting vulnerable citizens with low-level needs through the use of preventative services, we are able to maximise their independence which can in turn reduce or negate the requirement for statutory support.
National context:
The responsibility to provide public health services was transferred to the local authority in 2013. This includes services to prevent ill health and promote well-being.
Prevention and well-being services covers a broad spectrum of services, as the aim is to prevent the health and social care needs of borough residents escalating or deteriorating. Prevention includes a broad spectrum of services, including those services that prevent the initial need for adult social care services, to services that prevent hospital admission or an increase in packages of care.
Prevention can be split into 3 levels:
Primary prevention/promoting well-being:
Aimed at people who have low or no particular social care needs or symptoms of illness. The focus is on maintaining independence, good health and promoting well-being.
Interventions might include:
— promoting health and active lifestyles,
— delivering practical advice and support,
— increasing uptake of health screening programmes.
Secondary prevention/early Intervention:
Aim to identify people at risk and to halt or slow down any deterioration, and actively seek to improve their situation.
Interventions might include: screening and case finding to identify individuals at risk of specific health conditions or events (such as strokes, or falls) or those with low level social care needs.
Tertiary prevention:
Aim to minimise disability or deterioration from established health conditions or complex social needs. The focus is on maximising people’s functioning and independence.
Interventions might include:
— rehabilitation/enablement services,
— joint management of people with complex needs.

II.1.6)Common procurement vocabulary (CPV)

85000000

II.1.7)Information about Government Procurement Agreement (GPA)

The contract is covered by the Government Procurement Agreement (GPA): no

II.1.8)Lots

This contract is divided into lots: yes
Tenders may be submitted for all lots

II.1.9)Information about variants

Variants will be accepted: no
II.2)Quantity or scope of the contract

II.2.1)Total quantity or scope:

Trafford Council are tendering their Advocacy, Information and advice, Prevention and Well-being Services. This will come under 3 lots for a 3 year contract period.
Advocacy:
Trafford Council is committed to providing a universal, high quality, consistent and integrated Advocacy Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
To achieve this Trafford Borough Council (The Council) is planning to bring together a range of Independent Advocacy Casework functions to create an all-encompassing Advocacy Service, able to directly or indirectly provide a range of independent advocacy, for people requiring support.
This will include:
— statutory provision, Independent Mental Health Advocacy IMHA, Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy IMCA, Independent Care Act Advocacy ICAA, Independent NHS Complaints Advocacy ICA (from April 2016),
— extension of existing services offering advocacy support for vulnerable people, including people with physical impairments, learning disabilities and mental health conditions. This could be directly on an individual basis, through advocacy groups, or empowering self advocacy by building skills and confidence.
Information and Advice:
Trafford Council is committed to provide a universal high quality, consistent and integrated Information and Advice Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
1.2. Good information (which is current, relevant and accurate) is essential for all adults and their relatives who need, or may need support in order to know their rights and to live independently. Good information should help Trafford residents and carers make informed choices, enable them to take control and help service users and carers to maintain their abilities, skills and independence well into the future.
1.3. Information and advice often go hand in hand, but for the purposes of this document, it is important to be clear about the distinct definitions. Using the definitions outlined in Putting People First, in this context information to mean ‘the open and accessible supply of material deemed to be of interest to a particular population. This can either be passively available or actively distributed’.
1.4. Advice ‘offers guidance and direction on a particular course of action which needs to be taken in order to realise a need, access a service or realise individual entitlements’.
1.5. The overall vision nationally for information and advice is set out in Putting People First milestone four:
‘All citizens should be able to easily find locally relevant quality information and advice about their care and support needs in order to enable control and inform choice. Information should be available in a range of formats and through channels to make it accessible to all groups. Provision of information, advice and guidance should move from being largely developed from separate initiatives to a single coherent service strategy’.
2. Care act requirements:
The local authority must establish and maintain a service for providing people in its area with information and advice relating to care and support for adults and support for carers.
The local authority must provide information on:
— what types of care and support are available,
— the range of care and support services available to local people,
— the processes local people need to use to access the available support,
— where local people can find independent financial advice,
— how people can raise concerns about the safety or well-being of someone who has care and support needs.
3. Demographics/need in Trafford:
Overview:
The Trafford demographic is split between age groups is similar to that of England; the population is amongst the healthiest in the North West — but the North West is the least healthy region in the country; Trafford remains the ‘economic powerhouse’ of the region with world leading brands situated in the Borough, and with below regional average levels of unemployment. Crime in Trafford is low and has decreased significantly over the last few years.
Overall, Trafford is a relatively affluent Borough, certainly in regional terms, but also in national terms. It is one of the smaller District Councils within the Greater Manchester conurbation in terms of population, at 217 000 people, living in an estimated 96 000 dwellings and supporting in the region of 136 000 employee jobs. Trafford retains its status as the economic power house of the Greater Manchester conurbation.
The area has a strong local business base, high skill levels, a massively successful enterprise culture and above average levels of economic activity.

Trafford is home to more than 8,000 businesses ranging from household names to specialised niche, skilled operations; from sole traders to large organisations employing more than 500 people. More than 99 % of businesses are small and medium sized enterprises reflecting the business structure of the 21st century economy.

Prevention and Well-being:
Prevention and Well-being Services encourage care and support to be delivered in a partnership between individuals, communities, the voluntary sector, the NHS and councils. By supporting vulnerable citizens with low-level needs through the use of preventative services, we are able to maximise their independence which can in turn reduce or negate the requirement for statutory support.
National context:
The responsibility to provide public health services was transferred to the local authority in 2013. This includes services to prevent ill health and promote well-being.
Prevention and Well-being Services covers a broad spectrum of services, as the aim is to prevent the health and social care needs of borough residents escalating or deteriorating. Prevention includes a broad spectrum of services, including those services that prevent the initial need for adult social care services, to services that prevent hospital admission or an increase in packages of care.
Prevention can be split into three levels:
Primary Prevention/Promoting Well-being:
Aimed at people who have low or no particular social care needs or symptoms of illness. The focus is on maintaining independence, good health and promoting well-being.
Interventions might include:
— promoting health and active lifestyles,
— delivering practical advice and support,
— increasing uptake of health screening programmes.
Secondary Prevention/Early Intervention:
Aim to identify people at risk and to halt or slow down any deterioration, and actively seek to improve their situation.
Interventions might include: screening and case finding to identify individuals at risk of specific health conditions or events (such as strokes, or falls) or those with low level social care needs.
Tertiary Prevention:
Aim to minimise disability or deterioration from established health conditions or complex social needs. The focus is on maximising people’s functioning and independence.
Interventions might include:
— rehabilitation/enablement services,
— joint management of people with complex needs.

II.2.2)Information about options

Options: no

II.2.3)Information about renewals

This contract is subject to renewal: no

II.3)Duration of the contract or time limit for completion

Duration in months: 32 (from the award of the contract)

Information about lots

Lot No: 1Lot title: Advocacy Service

1)Short description

Trafford Council is committed to providing a universal, high quality, consistent and integrated Advocacy Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
1.2 To achieve this Trafford Borough Council (The Council) is planning to bring together a range of Independent Advocacy Casework functions to create an all-encompassing Advocacy Service, able to directly or indirectly provide a range of independent advocacy, for people requiring support. This will include; — Statutory provision, Independent Mental Health Advocacy IMHA, Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy IMCA, Independent Care Act Advocacy ICAA, Independent NHS Complaints Advocacy ICA (from April 2016) — Extension of existing services offering advocacy support for vulnerable people, including people with physical impairments, learning disabilities and mental health conditions. This could be directly on an individual basis, through advocacy groups, or empowering self advocacy by building skills and confidence.

2)Common procurement vocabulary (CPV)

85000000

3)Quantity or scope

Trafford Council is committed to providing a universal, high quality, consistent and integrated Advocacy Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
1.2. To achieve this Trafford Borough Council (The Council) is planning to bring together a range of Independent Advocacy Casework functions to create an all-encompassing Advocacy Service, able to directly or indirectly provide a range of independent advocacy, for people requiring support.
This will include:
— statutory provision, Independent Mental Health Advocacy IMHA, Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy IMCA, Independent Care Act Advocacy ICAA, Independent NHS Complaints Advocacy ICA (from April 2016),
— extension of existing services offering advocacy support for vulnerable people, including people with physical impairments, learning disabilities and mental health conditions. This could be directly on an individual basis, through advocacy groups, or empowering self advocacy by building skills and confidence.
Estimated value excluding VAT: 0 GBP

4)Indication about different date for duration of contract or starting/completion

Duration in months: 29 (from the award of the contract)
5)Additional information about lots

Lot No: 2Lot title: Information and Advice Service (T441)

1)Short description

Integrated Information and Advice Service. This service would play an important role in maximising people’s independence and help preventing reliance and dependency on more intensive care and support.
1.2. Good information (which is current, relevant and accurate) is essential for all adults and their relatives who need, or may need support in order to know their rights and to live independently. Good information should help Trafford residents and carers make informed choices, enable them to take control and help service users and carers to maintain their abilities, skills and independence well into the future.
1.3. Information and advice often go hand in hand, but for the purposes of this document, it is important to be clear about the distinct definitions. Using the definitions outlined in Putting People First, in this context information to mean ‘the open and accessible supply of material deemed to be of interest to a particular population. This can either be passively available or actively distributed’.
1.4. Advice ‘offers guidance and direction on a particular course of action which needs to be taken in order to realise a need, access a service or realise individual entitlements’ (I&DeA, 2009: 4).
1.1.5. The overall vision nationally for information and advice is set out in Putting People First milestone four:‘All citizens should be able to easily find locally relevant quality information and advice about their care and support needs in order to enable control and inform choice. Information should be available in a range of formats and through channels to make it accessible to all groups. Provision of information, advice and guidance should move from being largely developed from separate initiatives to a single coherent service strategy’.
2. Care act requirements:
The local authority must establish and maintain a service for providing people in its area with information and advice relating to care and support for adults and support for carers. The local authority must provide information on:
— what types of care and support are available,
— the range of care and support services available to local people,
— the processes local people need to use to access the available support,
— where local people can find independent financial advice,
— how people can raise concerns about the safety or well-being of someone who has care and support needs. The aims, objectives and outcomes of the Information and Advice Service are detailed, from the perspective of those using the Network, Alliance or Consortium, under the following 3 themes:
a. promoting independence and well-being;
b. promoting choice and control;
c. promoting accessible and joined up services.

2)Common procurement vocabulary (CPV)

85000000

3)Quantity or scope

Information and advice service provision:
The Provider will provide a flexible service to meet service users’ needs that will include out of hours cover including evening and where necessary weekend cover.
To meet the needs of service users the provider will offer an appropriate range and level of Services including the provision of:
a. minimum service provisions to include:
— High Quality Information and Advice Services on welfare rights, housing, legal and debt and financial advice across all adult client groups and their families and carers (older people including those with organic mental health problems, people with physical, and/or learning disabilities including autism or Asperger’s syndrome and sensory impairments.
Facilitate the exchange of best practice in Information and Advice Services including seminars, workshops and training for practitioners, service users and their families/carers.
Ensure an effective referral and sign posting service to a range of services such as employment, healthy living and leisure that help to maximise the independence of service users.
Outreach Services and drop ins, in partnership with local community organisations, to ensure widest possible reach and cover.
Facilitate and ensure smooth transition for service users to the new Services
Except where stated, the Network, Alliance or Consortium are free to propose their own working methods. However as part of the contract requirements, the Service Provider(s) must submit its proposed methods for delivering the Service for approval to the Council’s Lead Officer.
The Provider’s procedures shall reflect:
(a) a willingness to act reasonably and with due propriety at all time;
(b) a commitment to the principle of equal opportunities in Service provision and staff recruitment;
(c) full compliance with the relevant requirements of legislation including without limitation the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974, all subordinate legislation with particular attention to Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992, National Care Standards etc.;
(d) full compliance with the highest customer care principles, including ensuring People and their carers/relatives are provided with an informative, honest, sensitive, helpful and courteous Service at all times.
The Provider’s procedures shall not commit the Council to provide Services or give rights outside those provided by its policies, procedures and by legislation.
The Provider will ensure that all necessary documentation is properly and completed in a timely fashion and that computer records are promptly updated.
Estimated value excluding VAT: 0 GBP

4)Indication about different date for duration of contract or starting/completion

Duration in months: 32 (from the award of the contract)
5)Additional information about lots

Lot No: 3Lot title: Prevention and well-being

1)Short description

Prevention and well-being services encourage care and support to be delivered in a partnership between individuals, communities, the voluntary sector, the NHS and councils. By supporting vulnerable citizens with low-level needs through the use of preventative services, we are able to maximise their independence which can in turn reduce or negate the requirement for statutory support.
National context:
The responsibility to provide public health services was transferred to the local authority. This includes services to prevent ill health and promote well-being. Prevention and well-being services covers a broad spectrum of services, as the aim is to prevent the health and social care needs of borough residents escalating or deteriorating. Prevention includes a broad spectrum of services, including those services that prevent the initial need for adult social care services, to services that prevent hospital admission or an increase in packages of care. Prevention can be split into 3 levels:
Primary prevention/promoting well-being aimed at people who have low or no particular social care needs or symptoms of illness. The focus is on maintaining independence, good health and promoting well-being.
Interventions might include:
— promoting health and active lifestyles,
— delivering practical advice and support,
— increasing uptake of health screening programmes.
Secondary prevention/early intervention aim to identify people at risk and to halt or slow down any deterioration, and actively seek to improve their situation.
Interventions might include: screening and case finding to identify individuals at risk of specific health conditions or events (such as strokes, or falls) or those with low level social care needs.
Tertiary prevention aim to minimise disability or deterioration from established health conditions or complex social needs. The focus is on maximising people’s functioning and independence.
Interventions might include:
— rehabilitation/enablement services,
— joint management of people with complex needs.

2)Common procurement vocabulary (CPV)

85000000

3)Quantity or scope

This element of this service is to promote independence and well-being for older people in Trafford. The key aims are to:
— reduce the risk of older people suffering injuries, disability or death through falling,
— to reduce the number of people aged 50 and over in Trafford who are at risk of ill health caused by cold during winter months.
The objectives are to:
— provide an falls assessment for older people with recurrent falls or considered at risk of falls,
— contribute to a multifactorial intervention for those assessed as at increased risk of falls by providing strength and balance training (in line with NICE guidance) consisting of an initial course followed by an optional follow up course if required,
— work in partnership with other providers to signpost for other elements of the multifactorial intervention for fall prevention including:
• home hazard assessment and intervention;
• vision assessment and referral; and
• medication review with modification/withdrawal,
— provide information and advice to older people at risk of fuel poverty, in order to improve their health and well-being. This will include support and promotion of vaccinations, benefits entitlement and health promotion information as well as support for personal contingency planning,
— target the following priority groups who are most at risk for support in order to reduce illness due to the cold:
• aged 75 and over;
• people with disabilities;
• living with a health condition;
• struggling to pay for heating;
• a carer.
Service delivery:
— In order to support older people at risk of injury from falls, the service will provide a muscle-strengthening and balance programme, individually prescribed and monitored by an appropriately trained professional in a range of community settings across Trafford. This will:
• address potential barriers such as low self-efficacy and fear of falling, and encourage activity change as negotiated with the participant,
• advertise and promote strength and balance training programmes to older people in Trafford,
• have at least 10 % of sessions provided in extended care settings aimed at older people who are at risk of falling,
• provide follow on sessions, run by volunteers who are trained in teaching strength and balance training. In addition, they should also have up to date training in basic life support and a current DBS check;
— In order to support older people at risk of ill health due to the cold, the service will provide a range of advice and support to promote good health. This will include:
• support and promotion regarding the uptake of seasonal flu and pneumococcal vaccinations,
• advice and information for service users regarding benefit entitlement and reviews,
• brief advice, at every opportunity, to service users on improving their personal health such as healthy eating, stop smoking etc.,
• identification of vulnerable older people at risk of falls and signpost to health services,
• advise to vulnerable older people at risk of falls on simple measures to reduce the risk of falling in their own home,
• support for vulnerable older people to develop a personal crisis contingency plan for the winter- befriending support, buddy scheme.
Estimated value excluding VAT: 0 GBP

4)Indication about different date for duration of contract or starting/completion

Duration in months: 32 (from the award of the contract)
5)Additional information about lots

Section III: Legal, economic, financial and technical information

III.1)Conditions relating to the contract
III.1.1)Deposits and guarantees required:
III.1.2)Main financing conditions and payment arrangements and/or reference to the relevant provisions governing them:
III.1.3)Legal form to be taken by the group of economic operators to whom the contract is to be awarded:

III.1.4)Other particular conditions

The performance of the contract is subject to particular conditions: no
III.2)Conditions for participation
III.2.1)Personal situation of economic operators, including requirements relating to enrolment on professional or trade registers
III.2.2)Economic and financial ability
III.2.3)Technical capacity
III.2.4)Information about reserved contracts
III.3)Conditions specific to services contracts

III.3.1)Information about a particular profession

Execution of the service is reserved to a particular profession: no

III.3.2)Staff responsible for the execution of the service

Legal persons should indicate the names and professional qualifications of the staff responsible for the execution of the service: no

Section IV: Procedure

IV.1)Type of procedure

IV.1.1)Type of procedure

Open

IV.1.2)Limitations on the number of operators who will be invited to tender or to participate

Envisaged number of operators: 0

IV.1.3)Reduction of the number of operators during the negotiation or dialogue

Recourse to staged procedure to gradually reduce the number of solutions to be discussed or tenders to be negotiated no
IV.2)Award criteria

IV.2.1)Award criteria

The most economically advantageous tender in terms of the criteria stated in the specifications, in the invitation to tender or to negotiate or in the descriptive document

IV.2.2)Information about electronic auction

An electronic auction will be used: no
IV.3)Administrative information

IV.3.1)File reference number attributed by the contracting authority:

T441
IV.3.2)Previous publication(s) concerning the same contract

IV.3.3)Conditions for obtaining specifications and additional documents or descriptive document

Time limit for receipt of requests for documents or for accessing documents: 26.6.2015 – 16:00
Payable documents: no

IV.3.4)Time limit for receipt of tenders or requests to participate

26.6.2015 – 16:00

IV.3.5)Date of dispatch of invitations to tender or to participate to selected candidates

25.6.2015

IV.3.6)Language(s) in which tenders or requests to participate may be drawn up

English.

IV.3.7)Minimum time frame during which the tenderer must maintain the tender

in days: 90 (from the date stated for receipt of tender)

IV.3.8)Conditions for opening of tenders

Persons authorised to be present at the opening of tenders: no

Section VI: Complementary information

VI.1)Information about recurrence

This is a recurrent procurement: no

VI.2)Information about European Union funds

The contract is related to a project and/or programme financed by European Union funds: no

VI.3)Additional information

To access and download the tender documents Tenderers are required to be registered on the CHEST portal on the following link: www.the-chest.org.uk Once registered, the tender documents will be available for companies to download. You will find the tender documents by looking under Trafford Council in the Current Opportunities section. The Chest Reference Number is 9WJJ-ZQ33T5. Tenders are to be returned by uploading onto the CHEST Portal. Tenderers are required to comply with the instructions in the tender documents. The Contract will be for 3 year period on a 1 + 1 + 1 basis, commencing 3.8.2015, closing date and time for the submission of tenders is 26.6.2015 at 16:00 hrs. The Specification & Delivery Requirements section (Appendix B) details the service and quality standards required followed by a summary of the Delivery Requirements. Companies are required in their tender submission to indicate which of the Lots they would wish to supply.

VI.4)Procedures for appeal
VI.4.1)Body responsible for appeal procedures
VI.4.2)Lodging of appeals
VI.4.3)Service from which information about the lodging of appeals may be obtained

VI.5)Date of dispatch of this notice:

18.5.2015

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