Literature Review of Massive Open Online Courses and Online Distance Learning

Literature Review of Massive Open Online Courses and Online Distance Learning

A number of key issues have been raised including such basic questions as who studies via MOOCs and why; what are the outcomes for students; and how do these compare to outcomes for ‘conventional’ learners?

LITERATURE REVIEW OF MASSIVE OPEN ON-LINE COURSES AND OTHER FORMS OF ONLINE DISTANCE LEARNING

Reference number: BIS/RBU/27/2012

Deadline date:13/03/2013

This deadline is for… Noon on 13th March 2013 is deadline for submitting tenders.

Contract value:£0 – £0

Location where the contract is to be carried out: United Kingdom

Is this suitable for smaller suppliers? Yes

Is this contract suitable for a voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations? No

Name of the buying organisation: Business, Innovation and Skills

 

Description of the contract

There is a substantial history of open education resources across the world and in the UK, where the Open University has offered open-source educational resources and short courses free online for several years. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to provide large-scale participation and open access to course materials via the internet. They are different to open courseware in that groups of learners and teachers engage with each other over a period of time. They are open to all and have no formal entry requirements. They are similar to college courses, but typically do not offer academic credit. However, other forms of assessment and certification are increasingly being made available. So while MOOCs are not entirely new, it is clear that their pace of development worldwide and in the UK has been particularly rapid in the past 2-3 years. Recent months have seen a spate of major MOOCs launched by top-ranked US universities. Other UK and European universities have announced their involvement with Coursera, an internet course created by 2 Stanford University scientists. Providers claim that hundreds of thousands of students have signed up to a wide variety of courses. There has been a good deal of commentary and debate about whether the current rate of growth will continue and whether the business models that institutions and providers are operating will prove to be sustainable. It is certainly premature to predict what the impact will be on conventional education providers. But it is clear that MOOCs are raising a number of fundamental questions about the role of colleges and universities; timing and delivery; assessment; student engagement and experience; credits and awards; and a range of pedagogical issues. A number of key issues have been raised including such basic questions as who studies via MOOCs and why; what are the outcomes for students; and how do these compare to outcomes for ‘conventional’ learners? Particular concerns have been raised about the high level of non-completion of courses; and what are the outcomes for completers and non-completers?

 

Classification of the contract

73000000 Research and development services and related consultancy services

 

Additional information

Contract type: Services – Unspecified

Is it a framework agreement? No

Is this contract related to a programme of funding? Yes :

Contract will be awarded based on: Most economically advantageous tender in terms of: The criteria stated in the contract documents

Estimated length of contract: 15/03/2013 – 30/04/2013

 

Who to contact

Contact name Carole Hobson

Organisation name Business, Innovation and Skills

Address 2 St Pauls Place, 125 Norfolk Street, Sheffield, S1 2FJ

Telephone 0114 2075120

Extension number:

Fax

Web address

 

How to apply

All queries should be submitted to the Project Manager charles.ritchie@bis.gsi.gov.uk. Tenders must be submitted to RBU@bis.gsi.gov.uk ONLY